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"College is only a snapshot of your life. Don't let it define you."| A UVA Student on College Life


We had the privilege of interviewing Daniel S. via Google Doc and asked for some experience about: College Life


  • a student at the University of Virginia

  • tennis team captain in high school

  • had the highest total IB exam score award of his class

  • 34 on ACT, 1480 on SAT

Here are some important words he shares:

"I think the hardest thing about college was actually one of the most enjoyable parts of college: the freedom as well as the increased level of responsibility that has been given to me."

"Try your best, don’t lie to yourself."




Q: Do you have a job in college or have you done any internships?

A: I didn’t get a job while in college, as I didn’t think I would have the time to fit a job into my schedule. I haven’t done any internships either, but it depends on the person whether or not they do an internship early on in college.




Q: How many classes do college students typically take and which one have you found to be the most difficult?

A: For the college I’m attending, the minimum credit hours to be considered a full-time student per semester is 12, so that is around 4-5 classes and the recommended average is 15 per semester. The difficulty of classes depends on the person, and personally I’m not very good at memorization, so classes that focused on memorizing terms and facts in bulk were tough for me.




Q: What clubs/activities are you involved in? (fraternities, tutoring, fellows, etc.)

A: I’m actually in a Christian fellowship at my college (Grace Christian Fellowship), which I spend a lot of time with. Aside from that, I also volunteer at the university hospital through an organization on Grounds.




Q: In what ways have these activities benefited your college career or helped in your life/courses?

A: I have been lucky enough to find a great community in the Christian fellowship I am in, as I’ve developed many close friendships that will last a long time even after college. Outside of that, since I am striving for medical school, volunteering at the hospital has been a good way for me to get some experience in a hospital setting.



Q: What’s the hardest adjustment you made going into college? (courseload, self-control, finance, etc.)

A: I think the hardest thing about college was actually one of the most enjoyable parts of college: the freedom as well as the increased level of responsibility that has been given to me. For the first time, I was forced to be deliberate every single day and be responsible about what I do with my time. I was mostly on my own, without my parents to push me to go to school or get things done.




Q: Do you have anything else you would like to add? Any final words of wisdom?

A: Don’t stress too much about college applications and college life. Try your best, don’t lie to yourself. Find something fun to do like sports that can take your mind off school. When you study, take breaks and make sure the time you spend studying or working is efficient. Also, don’t compare yourself to others, and don’t let others compare you to others. That will only lead to unnecessary stress. SAT and ACT scores don’t define you. Whatever college you go to doesn’t define you.



Correction from previous post: Interviewee name is Daniel S., not Daniel W.